Panelists

René Aguigah
Joshua Kwesi Aikins
Kokou Azamede
Manuela Bauche
Bettina Brockmeyer
Elizabeth Buettner
Ibou Diop
Andreas Eckert
Larissa Förster
Albert Gouaffo
Rebekka Habermas
Hadija Haruna-Oelker
Uwe Jung
Christian Kopp
Ulrike Lindner
Flower Manase
Bertram Mapunda
Michael Mel
Stefanie Michels
Michelle R. Moyd
Yvonne Adhiambo Owuor
Ciraj Rassool
Ulrike Schaper
David Simo
Jackie Thomae
Andrew Zimmerman

René Aguigah

René Aguigah, born 1974, is head of the department “Literature Philosophy Religion” at Deutschlandfunk Kultur, where he has been employed since 2010. Previously he was the editor responsible for non-fiction at the magazine “Literaturen” and editor of the “Kritisches Tagebuch” of WDR 3. He lives in Berlin.

Joshua Kwesi Aikins

Joshua Kwesi Aikins is a political scientist, human rights activist, and a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Kassel’s Department of Development and Postcolonial Studies. His research interests include the interaction between western-style and indigenous political institutions in Ghana, post- and decolonial perspectives on ‘development,’ cultural and political representation of the African Diaspora, coloniality, and the politics of memory in Germany. In Germany, he served as an expert member of the Parliamentary Commission of inquiry on Racism and Discrimination in the State of Thuringia from 2017 to 2019. As a senior researcher with NGO Vielfalt entscheidet – Diversity in Leadership he co-developed the first differentiated equality data instrument that takes into account all dimensions protected under Germany’s Equal Treatment Act. This forms the basis of the just-completed Afrozensus.de the first large scale community survey for Black African and Afrodiasporic people in Germany. From 2013 to 2015 he coordinated the writing and finally presented the most comprehensive civil society led parallel report to Germany’s state report to the United Nations Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination. Aikins serves on the advisory board of Initiative Schwarze Menschen in Deutschland (Initiative Black People in Germany) and is involved in diaspora empowerment and the ongoing decolonial renaming of Berlin streets as part of a shift from colonial to anti- and decolonial commemoration in and beyond the German capital. In this context, he was a core member of a team whose efforts led to the renaming of Gröbenufer, a street honoring an enabler of the Brandenburgian enslavement enterprise on the shores of today’s Ghana, to May-Ayim-Ufer, now honoring the Afrogerman poet, social scientist and activist. In Ghana, he served as an associate researcher for the Ghana Constitution Review Commission.

Picture: © Tania Castellví

Kokou Azamede

Dr. Kokou Azamede received his doctorate in 2008 in Historical anthropology at the University of Bremen. He is since 2008 lecturer in the Department of German Studies at the University of Lome. He is a successively research fellow of the Volkswagen Foundation, the DAAD on the North German Mission Society in Bremen, and of the Fritz Thyssen Foundation on the Colonial photography at the University of Frankfurt/M.  His research interests include transcultural studies; Colonial photography; German colonial and missionary history in West Africa. He created the website http://kolonialfotografie.com/ for the didactical use of colonial images from Togo. His publications include:

Transkulturationen? Ewe-Christen zwischen Deutschland und Westafrika, 1884-1939, Stuttgart: Franz Steiner Verlag, 2010.

How to use colonial photography in Sub-Saharan Africa for educational and academic purposes: The case of Togo, in: Sissy Helff / Stefanie Michels (eds), Global Photographies: Memory – History – Archives (Image), Bielefeld: Transcript, 65 -77.

Vom »Heidentum« zum Christentum? Die Evangelisierung im westafrikanischen Missionsgebiet des Ewe-Landes in Missionsbildern, 1884–1914, in: Judith Becker, Katharina Stornig (Hg.): Menschen – Bilder – Eine Welt Ordnungen von Vielfalt in der religiösen Publizistik um 1900, Veröffentlichungen des Instituts für Europäische Geschichte Mainz, Mainz: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht Verlag, 65-90.

Manuela Bauche

Manuela Bauche is a historian with a focus on the history of colonialism and of life sciences of the 19th and 20th centuries. She also has several years of experience in historical-political education. Her dissertation examines the relationships between the fight against malaria, state rule, racism and classism in Cameroon, German East Africa and East Frisia around 1900. Since January 2019, Manuela Bauche has been the director of the project on the historical-political examination of the history of the building Ihnestr. 22. She is a member of the steering committee of the project Dekoloniale. Erinnerungskultur in der Stadt.

Picture: © Kerstin Kühl

Bettina Brockmeyer

Bettina Brockmeyer is a historian and Privatdozentin at Bielefeld University. She has been a visiting scholar at the University of Hamburg since 2020. Previously, she was a research associate at the Friedrich-Alexander University of Erlangen-Nürnberg. Her research focuses on colonial history, including the politics of memory and the history of human remains. Her second book analyses the biographies of a settler, a chief, and a missionary in East Africa. Selected publications:

“Geteilte Geschichte, geraubte Geschichte. Koloniale Biografien in Ostafrika (1880-1950)”, Frankfurt/M.: Campus (forthcoming),

Interpreting an Execution in German East Africa. Race, Gender, and Memory”, in: Dörte Lerp, Ulrike Lindner (Ed.), New Perspectives on the History of Gender and Empire. Comparative and Global Approaches, London: Bloomsbury 2018, pp. 87-113,

together with Frank Edward and Holger Stoecker: “The Mkwawa complex: A Tanzanian-European history about provenance, restitution, and politics”, in: Journal of Modern European History 18:2 (2020), pp.  117–139.

Elizabeth Buettner

Elizabeth Buettner has been Professor of Modern History at the University of Amsterdam since 2014.  Her publications encompass earlier work on Britain and late imperial India and memories of the ‘Raj’ in postcolonial Britain, particularly Empire Families: Britons and Late Imperial India (Oxford University Press, 2004); her more recent research focuses on postcolonial migration, multiculturalism, and memories of empire in Britain and other Western European countries.  Since her book Europe after Empire: Decolonization, Society, and Culture was published by Cambridge University Press in 2016, her research has extended further into the overlapping histories of postcolonial Europe and European integration.  This counts among the topics covered within the European Commission-funded Horizon 2020 consortium project she is now part of that explores ‘European Colonial Heritage Modalities in Entangled Cities’ (ECHOES; see http://projectechoes.eu)

For more information, see: https://www.uva.nl/en/profile/b/u/e.a.buettner/e.a.buettner.html

Ibou Diop

Ibou Coulibaly Diop is a university teacher and researcher. Since his studies in romance philology and German as a foreign language at the university of Berlin and Potsdam, he has been focusing his research on contemporary literature and especially on questions of globalisation. His current research looks at theories of Black literature, transculturality, fropolitanism and cosmopolitanism.

His latest publications focus on French-speaking women’s literature and negritude.

Picture: © Yero Adugan Eticha

Andreas Eckert

Andreas Eckert is Professor of African History at Humboldt University in Berlin, Germany. Since 2009 he is also Director of the Käte Hamburger Collegium “Work and Human Life Course in Global History” (re:work), funded by the German Federal Ministry for Education and Research. He widely published on 19th and 20th century African history, colonialism, labor, and global history and served for many years as editor of the Journal of African History. Eckert also regularly publishes for German newspapers like the “Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung” and “Die Zeit”. Most recent books: “Global Histories of Work”, ed, 2016, and “General History of Labour in Africa, 20th and 21st Centuries“, ed., 2019. He is about to complete a Short History of Colonialism, to be published by Princeton University Press.

Larissa Förster

Larissa Förster, PhD, is Head of the Department of Cultural Goods and Collections established in 2019 at the German Lost Art Foundation, and Associate Member of the Centre for Anthropological Research on Museums and Heritage at the Humboldt University, Berlin. She is a cultural and social anthropologist with a regional focus on Southern Africa and works on issues of postcolonial provenance and return with regard to artefacts and human remains. She co-edited „Museumsethnologie – Eine Einführung. Theorien – Praktiken – Debatten“ (2019) and „Provenienzforschung zu ethnografischen Sammlungen der Kolonialzeit. Positionen in der aktuellen Debatte“ (2018).

Albert Gouaffo

Albert Gouaffo has been a professor of German literature and cultural studies as well as intercultural communication at the Université de Dschang since 2014. Since 2015, he is the head of the department of applied foreign languages in the philosophical faculty of the same university. In December 2018, he was elected deputy president of the Association of German Studies in Sub-Saharan Africa (GAS) in Senegal. He is on the scientific advisory board of the Center for Cultural Heritage Losses (Colonial Contexts), on the project “Postcolonial Remembrance in the City” (Berlin), as well as on the project “TRANSMED! Thinking of the Méditerranée and European consciousness” at the German-French Youth Office, Berlin.

He studied German and Francophone African literature at the universities of Yaoundé (Cameroon), Hanover, and Saarbrücken. In 1997, he received his doctorate on the subject of “The Experience of Foreignness and Literary Reception Process. The Reception of Francophone African Literature in the German Language and Cultural Area 1949-1990”. In 2006 he habilitated at Saarland University on the topic “Knowledge and Cultural Transfer in a Colonial Context. The Example of Cameroon-Germany”. Currently, his research interests are postcolonial studies, German-African migration literature, memory topographies, colonial history, provenance research. Recent publication with Stefanie Michels: Colonial connections – transcultural memory topographies: The Rhineland in Germany and the grasslands of Cameroon. Bielefeld: Transcript-Verlag 2019.

Rebekka Habermas

Rebekka Habermas is a professor of Modern History at the University of Göttingen and held guest professorships in Oxford, Paris and New York. Her research interests lie in colonial history and history of knowledge. She has worked on the gender und religious history and in recent years, on the history of German colonialism, particularly in Africa and Oceania. She has also addressed postcolonial approaches, issues of knowledge transfer and questions of restitution. Her publication include: 

Skandal in Togo. Ein Kapitel deutscher Kolonialherrschaft, Frankfurt a.M. 2016;

Thieves in Court. The Making of the German Legal System in the Nineteenth Century, Cambridge 2016;

Rebekka Habermas (Ed.), Negotiating the Secular and the Religious in the German Empire. Transnational Approaches, Oxford 2019;

Rebekka Habermas/Richard Hölzl (Ed.), Mission global. Eine Verflechtungsgeschichte seit dem 19. Jahrhundert, Köln; Weimar; Wien; Böhlau, 2014.;

Rebekka Habermas/Alexandra Pzyrembel (Ed.), Von Käfern, Märkten und Menschen. Kolonialismus und Wissen in der Moderne. Göttingen 2013.;

Frauen und Männer des Bürgertums. Eine Familiengeschichte (1750-1850), Göttingen 2000, 2002.

Hadija Haruna-Oelker

The political scientist Hadija Haruna-Oelker lives as an author, editor and presenter in Frankfurt am Main. She mainly works for the Hessische Rundfunk – among others for the radio-magazine “Der Tag” (hr2 Kultur) and she moderates the regular event “StreitBar” at the Anne Frank Bildungsstätte in Frankfurt. Her work focuses on youth and social affairs, migration and racism research. Haruna-Oelker is co-editor of the anthology about black perspectives in germany “Spiegelblicke – Perspektiven Schwarzer Bewegungs in Deutschland” (Orlanda Verlag). She is the winner of the KAUSA Media Prize 2012, donated by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research, and the ARD Radio Prize Kurt Magnus 2015. She is part of the journalist Association “Neue Deutsche Medienmacher*innen” (NDM) and the Initiative of Black People in Germany (ISD). More: www.hadija-haruna.de

Uwe Jung

Uwe Jung, born 1968, studied African Studies at the Humboldt University in Berlin. Study of library and information sciences, also in Berlin. For many years head of the library and information department at the Goethe-Institut in Cameroon. Research assistant at the Department of Information Sciences at the Potsdam University of Applied Sciences.

Christian Kopp

Christian Kopp is a historian, curator and activist of the NGO Berlin Postkolonial. He has supported the campaign in commemoration of the 125th anniversary of the Berlin Africa Conference (in 2009/10), the initiative No Amnesty on Genocide! (since 2011) advocating reparations for Ovaherero and Namas and the ongoing campaign No Humboldt 21! (since 2013) demanding a moratory for the Humboldt Forum in Berlin. Since January 2020 he is part of the program DEKOLONIALE Erinnerungskultur in der Stadt and in charge of its digital story mapping and exhibition projects. 

Ulrike Lindner

Ulrike Lindner is a professor of Modern History at the University of Cologne. Her research interests lie in comparative, colonial and global history. She has worked on the history of social policy and in recent years, on the comparative history of European empires, particularly on German and British colonies in Africa. She has also addressed postcolonial approaches, issues of knowledge transfer between European empires, and questions of colonial labour. Her publication include:

Koloniale Begegnungen: Großbritannien und Deutschland als Imperialmächte in Afrika 1880-1914, Frankfurt a. M./New York: Campus, 2011; (co-edited with Sabine Damir-Geilsdorf),

Bonded Labour. Global and Comparative Perspectives (18th-21st Century), Bielefeld: Transcript, 2016;

(co-edited with Dörte Lerp): New Perspectives on the History of Gender and Empire: Comparative and Global Approaches , Bloomsbury Academic: London (2018). 

Flower Manase

Flower Manase is the Curator of History at the National Museum of Tanzania (Museum and House of Culture, Dar es Salaam) since 2009.  She has (BA Hons) in History and Archaeology and Msc.  in Natural Resource Assessment and Management, University of Dar es Salaam. Ms. Manase has worked in projects related to Germany colonial history, including “ReMIX”: “Afrika in Translation” in Tanzania, University of Bayreuth, and the German Colonialism exhibition “Fragments past and present” by the Deutsches Historisches Museum. Ms. Manase has also widely participated in ongoing debates and workshops in relation to “colonialism history/ projects” and “restitutions”. This includes the museum conversation workshops and conference organized with Goethe Institut in Kigali and Dar es Salaam. She is currently working on the provenance of objects collected during colonial period at the Museum and House of Culture, Dar es Salaam and Ethnological Museum, Berlin. 

Bertram Mapunda

Bertram Mapunda is a Professor of Anthropology and History at Jordan University College, TANZANIA, where he also served as the Principal of the College. Bertram is an alumnus of the University of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania (BA-Archaeology, 1989) and the University of Florida, USA (MA-Anthropology, 1991; and PhD Anthropology, 1995). Since 1995 he has been teaching archaeology, anthropology, heritage management, cultural tourism and history at both undergraduate and graduate levels; leading field-schools, as well as supervising MA and PhD students, first at the University of Dar es Salaam, and since October 2017, at Jordan University College, in Morogoro.   Throughout, he has remained active in field research, both personal and collaborative from which he has produced several publications including three edited books, two single-authored ones and over 40 book chapters and journal articles in archaeometallurgy, public archaeology, heritage management, cultural tourism and social history. Bertram has also served in various administrative positions, including Coordinator Archaeology Unit (4 years), Head, Department of History and Archaeology (6 years), Principal, College of Arts and Social Sciences (4 years); Principal College of Humanities (2 years)—all at the University of Dar es Salaam,  and Principal, Jordan University College, Morogoro (current position). 

Michael Mel

Michael Mel focuses on Indigenous processes of art-making, teaching, learning, and performing primarily within the context of mbowamb (the Mogei) of the Western Highlands Province, Papua New Guinea. His art performances and publications explore and articulate indigenous ways of seeing and experiencing art-making, body adornment, performance, and engagement. Conference keynotes have been shared in Papua New Guinea, Australia, Germany, and Canada. He has had opportunities to engage and share with others and has performed in and curated exhibitions in Papua New Guinea, Australia, New Caledonia, UK, US, and Canada. He completed a Ph.D. from Flinders University in South Australia and was a recipient of a Prince Claus Award from the Prince Claus Foundation in the Netherlands for his work in cultural communities for the Pacific. Michael is currently the Manager of Pacific and International Collections at the Australian Museum in Sydney, Australia.

Stefanie Michels

Stefanie Michels is an academic senior at the Institute for History at Heinrich-Heine University, Düsseldorf. She holds an MA in African Studies from the University of London (School of Oriental and African Studies) and received her Ph.D. from the University of Cologne with a dissertation on German colonial invasion in the Cross River Area of Cameroon. Her second book was on the visual representation of the German colonial soldiers in Africa. She was co-initiator of a collaborative research project of the colonial connections between the Rhineland in Germany and the Grassfields of Cameroon, some of the results were presented in exhibitions in Düsseldorf and Dschang, see also: Koloniale Verbindungen – transkulturelle Erinnerungstopographien, Bielefeld: transcript (co-edited with Albert Gouaffo) and www.deutschland-postkolonial.de for an interactive presentation of research results.

Michelle R. Moyd

Michelle Moyd is a historian of eastern Africa, with special interests in the region’s history of soldiering and warfare. Her first book, Violent Intermediaries: African Soldiers, Conquest, and Everyday Colonialism in German East Africa explores the social and cultural history of African soldiers (askari) in the colonial army of German East Africa, today’s Tanzania. The book examines how askari identities were shaped by their geographical and sociological origins, their ways of war, and their roles as agents of the colonial state. Her research interest lies in bringing the experience of nineteenth-century African-American soldiers into a broader analysis of soldiers of empire. Her publication includes:

Linguistic Disobedience: Restoring Power to Civic Language, Palgrave Macmillan, 2018 (co-authored with Yuliya Komska and David Gramling),

“In Service of Empires: Apaches and Askaris as Colonial Soldiers” (with Janne Lathi), Janne Lahti, ed. “Entangled Empires: German and United States Colonialism in a Connected World” (Palgrave 2021), forthcoming,

“Imagining African Warfare: War Games and Military Cultures in German East Africa”, Wayne Lee, ed. Warfare and Culture in World History, 2nd edition (NYU Press, 2020), forthcoming, With Joël Glasman,

“Military and Police” (with Joël Glasman) in General Labour History of Africa, edited by Stefano Bellucci and Andreas Eckert (James Currey Press, 2019).

Yvonne Adhiambo Owuor

Yvonne Adhiambo Owuor was born in Kenya. She is the author of the novel Dust, which was shortlisted for the Folio Prize. Winner of the Caine Prize for African Writing, she has also received an Iowa Writers’ Fellowship. Her work has appeared in McSweeney’s and other publications, and she has been a TEDx Nairobi speaker and a Lannan Foundation resident. She lives in Nairobi, Kenya.

Picture: © Maurice Weiss/ OSTKREUZ

Ciraj Rassool

Ciraj Rassool is a Senior Professor of History at the University of the Western Cape (UWC) and directs the Remaking Societies, Remaking Persons Supranational Forum. He directed the African Programme in Museum and Heritage Studies at UWC for 15 years. During 2015-2016, he was a visiting fellow at Morphomata Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities at the University of Cologne, where he continues to serve as Associate Member of the Global South Studies Center. He was on the boards of the District Six Museum and Iziko Museums of South Africa. He has previously chaired the Scientific Committee of the International Council of African Museums (AFRICOM), and is a member of the Scientific Advisory Board for the study of the Physical Anthropology Collection ‘Felix von Luschan’ at the Museum of Ethnology at the Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Germany. Among his latest publications are

The Politics of Heritage in Africa: Economies, Histories and Infrastructures (New York 2015), co-edited with Derek Peterson and Kodzo Gavua;

Rethinking Empire in Southern Africa (published as Journal of Southern African Studies, 41, 3, June 2015), co-edited with Dag Henrichsen, Giorgio Miescher and Lorena Rizzo,

Unsettled History: Making South African Public Pasts (Ann Arbor, 2017), written with Leslie Witz and Gary Minkley;

Missing and Missed: Subject, Politics, Memorialisation (published as Kronos: southern african histories, 44, 2018), co-edited with Nicky Rousseau and Riedwaan Moosage.

Ulrike Schaper

Ulrike Schaper is an Associate Professor (Juniorprofessorin) of Modern History at the Freie Universität Berlin. Her research has an emphasis in the global history of late nineteenth and twentieth century Germany. Currently, she works on West German sex tourism between ca. 1965 and 1995 in order to examine intersections of globalization, sexual liberalization and commodification in West-Germany’s relation to the “Third World”. She has worked extensively on German colonial history, colonial knowledge and colonial law and received her Ph.D. in 2010 with a study on the colonial legal order in the German colony of Cameroon. Published under the title Koloniale Verhandlungen – Gerichtsbarkeit, Verwaltung und Herrschaft in Kamerun 1884-1916 by Campus Verlag in 2012, this study approaches the colonial legal order from a cultural history perspective and analyzes how law and jurisdiction became sites in which colonial rule was demonstrated, implemented and negotiated.

David Simo

Cameroonian born scholar. Professor of German and comparative literature and culture at the University of Yaoundé 1 in Cameroon.  Director of the African German centre for scientific cooperation. Alexander von Humboldt ambassador scientist in Cameroon. Research fields: literary theory, History of Literature, Intercultural and transcultural studies, postcolonial criticism. Publications include:

Interkulturalität und ästhetische Erfahrung. Untersuchungen zum Werk Hubert Fichtes. Stuttgart: Metzler, 1993

Die Erfahrungen des Imperiums kehren zurück. Inszenierungen des Fremden in der deutschen Literatur. Comparativ; 12,2. Leipzig: Leipziger Univ.-Verl., 2002

Afrikanische Deutschland-Studien und deutsche Afrikanistik. Ein Spiegelbild. Würzburg: Königshausen & Neumann, 2014

Jackie Thomae

Jackie Thomae, born 1972 in Halle, grew up in Leipzig and Berlin, works as a journalist and television writer. Her debut novel Momente der Klarheit (Moments of Clarity) was published in 2015. She was shortlisted for the German Book Prize 2019 with her second novel Brüder (Brothers). She lives in Berlin.

Picture: © Urban Zintel

Andrew Zimmerman

Andrew Zimmerman studies revolutions, political thought, imperialism and capitalism. Originally a historian of Germany and Europe, their geographical focus now also includes the United States and West Africa. Their teaching and research explore decolonizing approaches to history, including transnational archival research and the use of social and political theory. Their recent research has focused on the global history of the U.S. Civil War, Reconstruction, and the New South. They are the author of Alabama in Africa: Booker T. Washington, the German Empire, and the Globalization of the New South (Princeton, 2010) and the editor of Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels, The Civil War in the United States (International Publishers, 2016). They are currently writing a history of the Civil War as an international working-class revolution with roots in Europe, Africa, and the Caribbean. It will be called “A Very Dangerous Element.” Their scholarship has been supported by organizations including the American Council of Learned Societies, the Guggenheim Foundation, and the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton.